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Start a Successful Business in 30 Days?

    • 51 posts
    February 5, 2013 12:24 AM EST

    Business idea

    business plan

    market and customer analysis

    investment

    implementation

     

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    Customer analytics | growth strategy

    • 6 posts
    May 11, 2009 9:47 AM EDT
    Whatever the name of the book if your ideas are sound then it should do well. There is a growing demand for infomation on starting a business so I hope it will be truly helpful to people that need it.
     

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    [URL=http://enormitytechnologies.com/]Best call center in India[/URL]

    • 1 posts
    May 12, 2009 8:29 AM EDT
    Remember that many businesses are started by non-business people.  They lack the financial intelligence necessary to be successful and often tend to operate by the seat of their pants.  If you go with the 30 steps idea I would hope to see steps focused on how to become financially savvy.

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    Susan C Hammond
    cfohammond@yahoo.com
    susan@schammond.com
    www.schammond.com

    • 5 posts
    May 11, 2009 4:40 AM EDT

    What if you were to re-title the prospective book into something like, "30 Steps in 30 Days to Building a Successful Business?"

    In other words, pull away from the "You`ll be successful in just 30 days," and move more toward showing the common success factors you`ve found?


    I agree!

    As I read Craig`s post I remembered a series of books I read some years ago. They were called "Teach Yourself [###] in 21 Days" - where [###] could be C, C++ or some other programming language or technical skill. I liked the concept and still do.

    It`s serious and still catching...

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    Carsten Jacobsen
    IT Entrepreneur, living in Denmark
    My Blog: www.ScandinavianMinds.com

    • 355 posts
    May 9, 2009 8:13 AM EDT
    Develop a business plan even if your not seeking outside funding.  My plan for example keeps me focused on the direction I want to go in.  It also forces me to look realistically at the market place.  This in turn requires me to define my potential customers and competitors.

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    The older we get, the more excuses we make for not chasing after our dreams. But truth is, goals are attainable at any age.

    • 22 posts
    February 15, 2013 3:20 AM EST

    I think your book could be a good tool. I would emphasize the need to create realistic, multi-year pro forma financials for at least the next three years, with at least the first twelve months broken out. It is way too easy to underestimate the funds needed for start-up and overestimate profit in the first few years. Everything needs to be accounted for, and some, as there is always something else that needs to be purchased or invested in. Plus, make sure to account for ongoing investment in the business. I would think it would be very useful if you showed in detail how to create financial projections, as a lot of people don't know how to do that part of a business plan.

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    Career MoversFinancial Analyst Job DescriptionExecutive Resume FormatFinancial Resume Writing Tips

    • 11 posts
    May 8, 2009 12:54 PM EDT
    Hi there-I`ve begun work on my book on how to build a successful business in 30 days. Obviously a daunting task, but I believe most businesses, whether online or off, share common factors in becoming successful. 

    I was curious--what your thoughts were as to the order of the steps? What things are mandatory, what things are optional?

    ANY advice, comments, suggestions, etc. would be greatly appreciated!

    By the way, the book will be targeted toward college/university-aged students, interested in building something successful before or upon graduation. 

    Thanks!

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    Want to start a business? Start with my blog at www.nickthacker.com

    Owner of www.highercallingmedia.com, www.highercallingmedia.com, a Texas web design company, and www.AspiringEntrepreneurs.net

    • 11 posts
    May 9, 2009 10:04 AM EDT
    nevadascul, thanks for the response and great advice!

    Certainly having a business plan is an essential element to producing positive results--I`ll go one step further: write it down! Having a plan on paper and in your head are two completely different things, and I make a big deal about writing as much as possible down in the book. 

    During the course of the "30 Days" process, I mention that the steps are all a part of the larger plan. Basically by working through the process, the reader is creating a business plan (one that may not be strong enough to receive VC funding, but a starting point nonetheless)!

    Once again, thanks for your thoughts and advice--also, I`ll have preview copies of the book in about a month--let me know if you`d like one via PM or email!

    Nick 

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    Want to start a business? Start with my blog at www.nickthacker.com

    Owner of www.highercallingmedia.com, www.highercallingmedia.com, a Texas web design company, and www.AspiringEntrepreneurs.net

    • 11 posts
    May 9, 2009 3:46 PM EDT
    When you say "successful business," do you mean that in 30 days you have the framework? Or are you suggesting that within 30 days you can start a business that will provide enough income to pay your monthly bills?

    Hi, Craig. 

    A "framework" most certainly can be built in 30 days, but obviously there are many variables (knowledge & skills, effort, luck, etc.) as well as what type of business it is that determine how quickly one can be built that will cover monthly expenses and provide a sound economic base. Likewise, projects can fall anwhere in between a "framework" and a "sound" business with disposal income.

    That said, however, the book will in fact focus on building a framework that, if used and created properly, can provide enough income to be considered a "real business." 

    I spend a good portion of the book`s introduction helping readers define what "success" will look like. For example, I explain my opportunity cost of running my businesses (three of which were built using the "30 Days" principles): If I didn`t run my businesses, I could feasibly make about $1200 before taxes delivering pizzas. Therefore, my businesses needed to make at least that amount for me to consider them "successful."

    So you see, the ultimate answer depends on the individual`s definition of "successful business," but the bottom line is that I know a business that makes at least some money can be built in 30 days. 

    How does that sound? I encourage your further questions and advice!

    --Nick 

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    Want to start a business? Start with my blog at www.nickthacker.com

    Owner of www.highercallingmedia.com, www.highercallingmedia.com, a Texas web design company, and www.AspiringEntrepreneurs.net

    • 11 posts
    May 11, 2009 10:44 AM EDT
    Ugh--sorry I`ve not posted for awhile--my hosting company saw that I had a folder full of .mp3 files (I run a music publishing company that sells downloadable Christian music...) and cried "terrorism!" and shut off my account...

    Got it all working now, but I see I missed quite a few GREAT responses! I hope you haven`t wandered off...

    First, thanks again for the support--it makes me giddy to realize that there may actually be some people out there who`d be into the book! I will definitely keep everyone here posted on its progress--I`ve finished the first two "Days" or tasks, and they`re looking pretty solid!

    Second, I agree with you, CraigL and Carsten, that the book will hit some skepticism. I will certainly leave the options open to re-titling the book to alleviate qualms about the proverbial "get-rich-quick" scheme.

    Also, shout-out to bryneof01 and BigIdea--thanks for the comments and support, and be sure to tell all your college friends/family you may have!

    I`ll check back soon,
    Nick


    NickThacker5/11/2009 3:40 PM

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    Want to start a business? Start with my blog at www.nickthacker.com

    Owner of www.highercallingmedia.com, www.highercallingmedia.com, a Texas web design company, and www.AspiringEntrepreneurs.net

    • 11 posts
    May 12, 2009 5:04 AM EDT
    I think you should definitely make it available on CD so people can listen to it while they drive and learn.  That would be great for the busy professional on the go trying to start their own biz on the side.



    Hey, I like that idea!

    It wouldn`t be too hard to make a professional-sounding and great-looking CD package to sell with the book or separate from it...

    How would you imagine selling it? Separate or together?

    Nick

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    Want to start a business? Start with my blog at www.nickthacker.com

    Owner of www.highercallingmedia.com, www.highercallingmedia.com, a Texas web design company, and www.AspiringEntrepreneurs.net

    • 11 posts
    May 18, 2009 8:25 PM EDT
    Remember that many businesses are started by non-business people.  They lack the financial intelligence necessary to be successful and often tend to operate by the seat of their pants.  If you go with the 30 steps idea I would hope to see steps focused on how to become financially savvy.


    Definitely, CFOHammond--thanks for this tip!

    I hope that the book, while separated into "tasks" organized around each day, will have a novel-like feel, one that is read cover to cover. The reason I`m shooting for this style is so readers will benefit from the knowledge gained the previous lessons, including financial advice, tips, and strategies, so by the end they will be better prepared to handle the cash flow requirements of a business. 

    Remember--serial entrepreneurs certainly benefit from their and others` experience, but many successful firms have been founded by the seat-of-the-pants mantra! Oviously the goal is show that these businesses are the anomoly, not the rule--the point is that a little luck and hard work goes a long way!

    Nick 

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    Want to start a business? Start with my blog at www.nickthacker.com

    Owner of www.highercallingmedia.com, www.highercallingmedia.com, a Texas web design company, and www.AspiringEntrepreneurs.net

    • 11 posts
    May 18, 2009 8:37 PM EDT
    Why 30 days? Wouldn`t 365 days be more realistic? I mean how much can you actually accomplish in 30 days? And what is your measure of  "successful?"

    I am totally not trying to put a damper on your book or your thought process. But I`m just wondering if 30 days is enough time to know if anything about the business will be successful. 

    Personally, I think, the only way you can tell if a business is going to be successful or not is by longevity and profit? If you`re not using either of those measures as a benchmark then you`re basically writing a book about how to start a business the right way but that`s not a prediction on if the business will be successful.

    And I understand your pizza delivery example, but I can sell my laptop on ebay and make $1500 but would that be a successful business in a sustained way. 

    I know our cultured is geared to quick fixes and instant results but building a real business shouldn`t be one of those things that come quickly or instantly. Building a real business takes time, work, research and effort. But this is just my opinion. 

    Once again, I am not trying to rain on your idea, I`m just hoping you can answer these questions because I`m sure some of your customer will have the same questions.

    I would say seriously consider revising the title to something that you can truly deliver in the book, unless you`re totally sold on that as your title. 

    I like the idea of the book though. I hope its successful.


    Hello, stevens!

    First, thanks for the tips and advice--the "measure of success" is up to the individual, and my book may or may not cater to their definition of success. I can say, however, that one of the goals of the book itself is to help readers evaluate their measure of success to determine that striking out on the "30 Days" journey will be worth it or not. 

    You mention using profit and longevity as benchmarks for a successful business, but venture capitalists can only guess at these--yet they still put up money for businesses that just "have that edge." I will certainly address these factors as important benchmarks, but don`t forget about time commitment, vision, dedication, and luck. 

    Remember, the "30 Days" method may take some people 10, 40, or 365 days to complete, but the idea is to attract people who want a method for building a business that guides them through tricky, yet common, waters. I`m aiming at people who don`t want to read about building a specific business, yet I will make it clear that they should know what businesses will be too small or large to be feasible. 

    Here`s a good way to sum it up: My readers will be able to create a legitimate, sustainable business using 30 tasks, hopefully in 30 days, that will not be the next Google in one month, but one that will provide the foundation necessary to succeed to whatever measure of success they set for themselves. 

    We are not growing an entire vineyard in 30 days, but we are growing a fruit-bearing tree. 

    Nick

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    Want to start a business? Start with my blog at www.nickthacker.com

    Owner of www.highercallingmedia.com, www.highercallingmedia.com, a Texas web design company, and www.AspiringEntrepreneurs.net

    • 11 posts
    May 18, 2009 8:40 PM EDT
    I `hung my shingle` 22 days after deciding to become a Virtual Assistant.  One of the first things I decided is "make sure you have your accounting records set up from the get go."  This doesn`t necessarily mean having a software program, but at least tracking income/expenses, etc.  My grandmother always said `begin as you intend to go on.`  I use this philosophy in my business as well as my personal life.  Hope this helps.

    Hmm, I really like your grandmother`s saying--I also like your emphasis on the financials and accounting aspects. I would love to talk with you more about what worked/didn`t work with your planning and preparation in this regard--I admit that the financial aspects of business are not my strong suit!

    Email me if you`d like!
    Nick 





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    Want to start a business? Start with my blog at www.nickthacker.com

    Owner of www.highercallingmedia.com, www.highercallingmedia.com, a Texas web design company, and www.AspiringEntrepreneurs.net

    • 38 posts
    February 14, 2013 6:14 PM EST

     I think, thirty days are really less time to success any business. As a result of any business initially have to be compelled to target customers then product quality, market, etc. To start out any new business more challengeable to the business owner.

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    Market Research | Market Report | Industry Analysis

    • 27 posts
    May 12, 2009 1:14 PM EDT
    Why 30 days? Wouldn`t 365 days be more realistic? I mean how much can you actually accomplish in 30 days? And what is your measure of  "successful?"

    I am totally not trying to put a damper on your book or your thought process. But I`m just wondering if 30 days is enough time to know if anything about the business will be successful. 

    Personally, I think, the only way you can tell if a business is going to be successful or not is by longevity and profit? If you`re not using either of those measures as a benchmark then you`re basically writing a book about how to start a business the right way but that`s not a prediction on if the business will be successful.

    And I understand your pizza delivery example, but I can sell my laptop on ebay and make $1500 but would that be a successful business in a sustained way. 

    I know our cultured is geared to quick fixes and instant results but building a real business shouldn`t be one of those things that come quickly or instantly. Building a real business takes time, work, research and effort. But this is just my opinion. 

    Once again, I am not trying to rain on your idea, I`m just hoping you can answer these questions because I`m sure some of your customer will have the same questions.

    I would say seriously consider revising the title to something that you can truly deliver in the book, unless you`re totally sold on that as your title. 

    I like the idea of the book though. I hope its successful.
    stevens5/12/2009 6:20 PM
    • 49 posts
    February 14, 2013 6:29 PM EST

    Yeah Ross !! You are right 30 days are very less to start a business.