Make Connections

Network, Get Answers, Find Members in Your Area, and More!

Forums » Customer Service & Customer Experience

What to do when customers start to run out

    • 2 posts
    July 15, 2013 3:54 AM EDT

    I agree that it will be good more closely work to clients, to stay in contact with them, - to send them letters, not only the about business. And so on. Some CRM solutions to manage clients like basemaster.com, zoho.com, etc. can help 

    • 7 posts
    July 11, 2013 8:23 PM EDT
    To start a business is really easy task but the work load appears when it comes to attract customer to your place, to understand your customer is really important what he needs and what is the quantity and quality of products you are selling in demand because if you fail to empower your selves with his needs you get to loose his /her trust and this could make your business suffer indeed .a good communication with the customer is really important making it a tool of your excellence in the market.
    • 3 posts
    June 12, 2013 7:11 PM EDT

    I notice that he is really focusing on what customer need which is really good and very impressive.I remember some kundeservice or customer service in Denmark where they are also focusing on giving the best customer service to get the satisfaction and i also seen the good idea's and plan to get the attention of many customer which is also amazing like this. 

    • 23 posts
    May 3, 2012 10:29 PM EDT

    Every business requires a lot of permanent customers. It is important thing for a business to make their customers happy. The information you have provided is really helpful for business owners. They can make their customers happy after reading your post.

    safety management system | recruitment software

    • 344 posts
    September 21, 2011 9:04 PM EDT

    Sometimes called the Product/Market Expansion Grid, the Ansoff Matrix shows four ways that businesses can grow. It can help you think through the risks associated with each option.

    Imagine a square divided into four quadrants representing your four growth choices, which include selling

    1. Existing products to existing customers

    2. New products to existing customers

    3. Existing products to new markets

    4. New products to new markets

    The four choices are presented from least to most risky. In a smaller business, with few dollars to gamble, focusing your attention on the first two options will give you the lowest-risk options for growth.

    Existing products to existing customers

    It’s natural to feel like you’re being greedy when you go back to the same customers for more of their dollars, but the opposite can often be true. Your best customers are usually the ones who know and like you the most, and are often pleased to find out that you – someone they trust – are offering something they need.

    When I was 16, I worked in a hardware store. My boss was an enterprising entrepreneur who understood Ansoff’s Matrix (although he certainly didn’t call it that).

    We cut keys for people in the store and made more than a 150-per-cent mark up on each one.

    The problem was that our key cutter was hidden in a corner and nobody knew it was there. As a result, we didn’t cut many keys.

    One day, my boss decided to move the key cutter and position it directly behind the cash register so that everyone paying for their hardware could see the machine.

    Customers started to see the cutter and realized – often to their pleasant surprise – that we cut keys.

    Not surprisingly, we started selling a lot more keys to our loyal customers.

    If you want to sell more of your existing products to your existing customers, draw up a simple chart of your products and services.

    Don’t be afraid to dust off those old products that you haven’t paid much attention to lately. List your best customers’ names down one side of the paper and your products across the top.

    Then cross-reference your customer list with your product list to identify opportunities to sell your best customers more of your existing products.

    New products to existing customers

    A friend of mine owns a BMW dealership. His typical customer is a family patriarch in his forties.

    When my friend felt like he had saturated the market for well-heeled forty-something men in his trading area, he thought about what other products he could sell to his existing customers.

    But instead of defining his customer as the forty-something man, he decided to think of his customer as the financially successful family, and his market as their driveway.

    So instead of trying to sell more BMWs into a market of diminishing returns, he bought a Chrysler dealership so that he could sell minivans to the wives of his BMW buyers. He then realized a lot of his customers had kids in their teens, so he bought a Kia dealership to sell the family a third, inexpensive car.

    When your growth slows, it can be tempting to diversify out of your core.

    But the least risky growth strategy will be to figure out what else you could sell to your existing customers.

    ---

    Global buy sell B2B trade marketplace

    • 35 posts
    November 11, 2011 9:20 PM EST

     

    New products to existing customers

    A friend of mine owns a BMW dealership. His typical customer is a family patriarch in his forties.

    When my friend felt like he had saturated the market for well-heeled forty-something men in his trading area, he thought about what other products he could sell to his existing customers.

    But instead of defining his customer as the forty-something man, he decided to think of his customer as the financially successful family, and his market as their driveway.

    So instead of trying to sell more BMWs into a market of diminishing returns, he bought a Chrysler parts dealership so that he could sell minivans to the wives of his BMW buyers. He then realized a lot of his customers had kids in their teens, so he bought a Kia dealership to sell the family a third, inexpensive car.

    When your growth slows, it can be tempting to diversify out of your core.

    But the least risky growth strategy will be to figure out what else you could sell to your existing customers.


    ------------------------

     Those are very nice heads up you have posted here. But we have to admit, with the economics that we are having, automobile industry businesses are surely having a hard time. Cause a lot of car or car parts consumers are saving there moneys. If you know what I'm saying.

     

     

    ---
    OurHomeLoans

    • 34 posts
    July 22, 2012 1:46 AM EDT

    First of all a business with running customers cannot survive in this fast competing world. Customers always look for convenient, effective and fast services. To do so you need professionals to handle your clients. Hiring personals only for clients is extremely expensive. To cover all the aspects within your budget, just add Live Support Chat to Website which can help you to solve problems of your clients. This would increase customer satisfaction and your clientele.

    • 4 posts
    December 20, 2011 1:33 AM EST

    Thank you for this Interesting and Useful Information.