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How do you charge for shipping at your web site?

    • 270 posts
    June 2, 2009 8:19 AM EDT

    Have any of the members of SuN ever thought about things we all assume to be accepted business practices, then find they are not when it comes to the web? 

    Let me tell you why I bring this up.  In my industry, my company deals with businesses, including web retailers that ship products of all types.  When businesses come to us, most act like shipping costs are just a negative sales expense that customers will pay with no questions asked.   They assume this to be a fact because it has always been that way.

    So, I ask you, have you ever seen a study or any other facts to supports the fact customers expect to pay shipping costs?  I am in the industry and have not found anything!

    This makes me rethink this “accepted” practice.  Maybe it is not true that we should not worry about shipping costs just because they can be passed to the customers.   Yes, it is so heavily assumed to be a fact that the carriers even provide free API’s to make these calculations at our web sites.  But is this good for my business and my customers?  Is the web a different market that does not support these old ways of mail order catalog and business “freight plus” thinking?

    The truth is shipping costs are a leading form of shopping cart abandonment.  There are studies that back this up.  Another fact is if the actual shipping costs are used, the farther away your customer is from your businesses, the more likely it is that they will not buy your product because of shipping costs.  So why do we spend so much time and money continuing to use the old outdated concepts and practices?

    Has any one discovered better ways to deal with shipping at your web site?  I just do not understand why this has not been brought into question as we develop new retail web sites more.  What are your thoughts?

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 3, 2009 7:54 AM EDT

    Thank you for all this input!  These are all great comments and links! 

    There are some facts that I hear all the time.  It seems like many times I speak with a web consumer about ordering something on the web, they tell me that they bought more from a site because they had free shipping or they took advantage of a flat rate for an order of a certain value.  Many times they bought more volume or items just to take advantage of the shipping offer.

    I totally agree that free shipping on its own can be very bad.  Shipping is a cost that must be accounted for in some way.  One idea it to average your shipping costs so it can become part of your product costs when determining one price.  This is one way to offer free shipping and potentially expanding your market at the same time, without going in the red doing it.  I explored this concept a couple of years ago in a free paper found at:

    http://www.businessshipper.com/whitepapers/Handling%20Shippi ng%20Costs.pdf

    I also agree that adding shipping and handling cost to make it a profit center is a foolish mistake.  People do not like surprises at the end of the sales process let alone those they know are profit taking.  Today’s Internet consumer knows how much it costs to ship a product.  In the past, it was hard to get data in a easy fashion.  With the introduction of Internet this is not the case any more.  Heck you can get this and other pricing data right on your iPhone as you shop!

    I definitely agree that things are changing so we all need to question everything we are doing.  In the current economy, people are doing a lot of price comparing and trying to stretch every dollar.  With increases in our taxes and necessity costs just around the corner, this could even get worse.  This was not the case even one or two years ago. 

    A good example is many consumers tell me they are ordering the same product in multiple browser windows getting to the final costs and then choosing the store that comes up with the best price and abandoning the others.  In that case, how you know that they abandoned the cart because of shipping?  Because of examples like this I question if we really know the value of all the current studies I have read, especially when you take the current market conditions in to consideration.

    The other thing I have noted from some of our successful business customers is that changing times require rethinking how we deal with everything we do.  If you care to read about some of them check out the following whitepapers:

    http://www.harveysoft.com/cps_pgs/custom/AlibrisCaseStudy.pd f

    http://www.harveysoft.com/cps_pgs/custom/NiagaraCycleHSICS.p df

    I gave you these two examples just to show what I am seeing from some innovative thinking companies.  They are examples of why I think we all need to rethink what we are doing.  I also chose these two examples because I agree Amazon is a good business model and they are some of the many Amazon resellers that use our products and that I know are currently doing well.

    I hope you now see why I question setting up our web sites using carrier based API’s, shopping cart provided ZIP-Weight tools or ZIP code-weight charts that could keep us from taking advantage of today’s market opportunities.  I have noticed the companies that re-think this process are doing much better in today’s marketplace.

    In the past shipping charges were not significant enough to worry about.  We just passed them to our customers who did not really seem to care.  Some companies even got by with making a profit from inflating the shipping costs.  I think today shipping charges are large enough to kill sales.

    What to you all think?

     

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 3, 2009 10:51 AM EDT

    Craig, I think you are dead on.  I find it almost insulting when I go to a retail site and they have surprise costs at checkout time.  Checkout is too much work for the buyer as it is without throwing in unexpected costs.  I think all sites should be up front about all charges if they do not want to lose buyers at checkout.  This definitely includes shipping.

     

    I also think that each site needs to figure out what works best for them as was pointed out by Phillip.  A site that sells a one of a kind product can get by with more handling and shipping charges at the end of the process than a site that has a lot of competition.  I do feel that in all cases that shipping charges should be handled as an averaged rates rather than actual charges to maximize market size.

     

    I guess, like I believe Phillip pointed out, we tend to misunderstand or ignore the facts and just go back to what we think we know.  I think it is time to be innovative.

     

    I was recently at an awards banquet where Dr. Gene Landrum (http://www.genelandrum.com/), who originated the Chuck E. Cheese concept, spoke.  He is a very interesting entrepreneur to listen to.  In his new book and at the lecture he pointed out things like:

     

    Innovators go where the pack fears; xenophobia is never a factor

    Innovators think in Reverse, for them the end is the beginning

    Innovators create by destroying; for them the new trumps the known

    Innovators passionately pursue knowledge; they’re accidentally sagacious

    Innovators are Zen Masters on a Trek to Shangri La

    Innovators are Beach Bums; escaping the Real via treks to the Surreal

    Innovators are Irrational, Illogical & Irreverent – antithetic to old dogmas

     

    He also said you knew if you were an entrepreneur if your spouse was always asking when you were going to get a real job.  Boy did that sound familiar!

     

    Well I think when it comes to shopping carts and these costs we have a long way to go before we get it right and it needs a lot of innovation.

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 4, 2009 12:54 PM EDT

    After making my last post a friend in the retail industry said something to me that makes a lot of sense.  If a customer is at your site and sees your product for say $25.95 and they add it to their cart, they already know that it will cost $25.95 so that sticker shock is over.  Now if they continue to checkout and they come to the final total, shipping cost is usually the only thing added that is unexpected, especially for a single item purchase.  Therefore, if they abandon the cart at that point it was the item price + the shipping charge that made them not complete to order.  This gives you a quick and dirty way to prove that if you are seeing a lot of abandoned carts at your site on the submit order page, it is more than likely the cost of shipping that drove them away.

     

    Interesting point when we are all trying to devise elaborate ways to determine the reason for lost sales.  Any thoughts on this?

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 5, 2009 6:09 AM EDT

    Good points Patrick!

     

    It is amazing how many web sites do not disclose these charges up front.  Some of our most successful business customers go a step further and use their extra charges as a selling tool to increase volume with economy of scale type offers.  To this day I cannot believe how many people say they don’t want to cheat the customer and only charge actual shipping charges.  The fact that this has to be done at checkout causes shopping cart loss on its own.  The truth is that business that does this is cheating themselves out of orders the further the customer gets from their business!

     

    Nearly everyone that is old enough to purchase on line today, is accustomed to going to a store and purchasing something for a given price.  In our life time there have always been more people buying goods at local stores than on line or mail order.  I think one of the many reasons why more and more people buy on line is because the experience is getting closer and closer to what they are accustomed to.  The ways to display products is much better.  We are learning to be upfront with them about all costs.  I think this is one of the many reasons companies that are displaying total price at the time of “adding to the cart” have a distinct advantage over those that hide the additional cost and other details to the last minute.

     

    One other point for thought, Amazon is an amazing business model that works, do you see any other costs being added to their orders at close out other than shipping and sometimes sales tax?

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 5, 2009 8:41 AM EDT

    Steve, I agree with your comments.  The cost of transportation is another good reason why people are turning to the web.  The reason this has been happening slowly, is because it is hard to figure out how much you spend when you drive to shop without a lot of work.  Now that we are looking at our expense closer, more are beginning to realize the savings of shopping on line.

    Your example with Amazon demonstrates how successful retailers are using shipping costs to increase their sales.  Some of our customers that use Amazon to resell through have noted this problem when selling their products at Amazon`s site.  Many of those have been force to be creative and not just sell on the lowest unit price, but the best price when shipping costs are accounted for.

    I feel that the economic stress, fuel prices and even higher fuel costs due to up coming federal taxes increases will be driving more to the web to shop in the upcoming months.  But these same issues are going to be problems for carriers and everyone else including internet resellers and there customers.  I think the best solution I have heard to date is being up front with costs and the cheaper you can make your shipping costs, the more competitive you will be at your web site when pricing your product.  This is true whether or not you use free shipping or charge for it.

     

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 5, 2009 11:34 AM EDT

    As always, Craig well thought out points!

    The interesting thing I find is how many businesses still tell me:

    “Shipping charges do not matter because customers will pay whatever we charge, they expect it.  I just want to charge the actual amount so we don’t look like we are taking advantage of them.”

    Those business practices are opportunity for the right competitor…

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 8, 2009 8:21 AM EDT

    Patrick,

    Even though what you say is generally correct, I agree with Craig that most shoppers will not take the time to figure this all out.  There are several reasons.  Many times the customer may not have enough information like actual weight.  Customers like to make decision quick with the information easily obtained when shopping on the web.  For ease of shopping they will compare several retailer prices between sites and buy the one that has the best price, before they will try to check the shipping amount at a single site.  At least that is what I have found and I have been told.

    bert2009-6-8 13:22:14

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    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 8, 2009 10:43 AM EDT

    Roland,

    You say it so much better and simplier than I.  Must be the Web 2.0+ designer skill coming out.  I do feel there are times where flat rate shipping is just as effective as free shipping though and maybe even needed.  I know my wife will buy something extra just to get the free shipping and then tell me about all the money we saved!

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 11, 2009 8:57 AM EDT
    Biziness,

     

    Well thought out post and I agree with nearly everything you say.  But this brings me back to item that bothers me most.  Why do so many businesses use API and other web utilities that add actual shipping charges to their orders at the time of checkout?  Many even use the discounted amounts they receive from carriers thinking they are “saving” the customers money on shipping, when in fact they should be keeping the savings to cover for flat rate overages until they get the average right.  Charging flat rates would be a much better and safer method.  It also increases market size and can be used to increase sales.  We both agree that using actual charges is not the best practice, but it seems to be the practice that happens at most internet retail sites.  Why has this gone unnoticed?

     

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 19, 2009 6:26 AM EDT

    When we have done the math with companies that use API`s and charge actual shipping costs, we have found all of them have eaten costs and lost business the farther away their customer gets from their business.  The funny part is they have no clue this is going on or have taken the time to figure this out!

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 19, 2009 12:29 PM EDT

    That sounds like a good plan to me, as long as you compare how much you paid for shipping verses how much you collected for shipping every week, month or quarter.  And make adjustments to make sure you are making a profit!  In my experience, you should have a fixed amount for standard, expedited and international shipping amount by size, weight or total amount of order or whatever works best for you.  You can even use free shipping when you know your profits easily cover shipping and make you a good profit.  That is really the same as a fixed amount but psychologically it can increase sales.

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 24, 2009 6:33 AM EDT

    I thought you all might like to see this article...

    http://www.internetretailer.com/dailyNews.asp?id=30897

     

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 25, 2009 2:48 AM EDT

    Biziness, I agree with your points.  Domestically and internationally, USPS is just another great option but it is not the solution for every package.  For example, many times it can be cheaper to use FedEx or UPS when shipping items greater than 5 lbs even when insurance or peace of mind is not involved.  To get the best price and service you really need to weigh every package you ship and check the price, including all extra services like insurance, even if you think you know the best way.  You will be surprised at how many times you are wrong.  That is why using a single carrier solution like USPS Click-N-Ship is not the perfect solution for most businesses that ship regularly.  In fact it can cost you money in the long run.  To minimize your shipping costs you need multi-carrier shipping solution.  But this is a whole subject of its own.

     

    The interesting thing about this article is the fact that they are seeing shopping cart abandonment from shipping costs as one of the biggest problems.  I think it may be even bigger than they state because they are looking at those that abandoned the shopping carts at checkout.  You have to wonder how many never went to check out because the shipping charges were not handled correctly at the web site in the first place

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 25, 2009 9:53 AM EDT

    Kathy, that is great that things are working out for you so well.  Shipping needs are different for every company but one must to stay on top of changes and be careful not to lock yourself into one carrier.  A union strikes, bad weather, or even a single annual price change can change your business profits overnight.

    Even though business outflows and costs are different, I think how you deal with shipping costs at a web site has some definite commonalities.  For example, I think free shipping should be used to increase sales volumes at the time of purchase.  Or, flat rate shipping should be used to increase market size.

    Regardless of how you handle your shipping, I think it is very important that you let the customer know up front all the options.  You should also look at people exiting from your web site from you shipping options page because that is no different than them leaving at checkout.  And, you need to know when you are scaring off customers.

    At least that is my two cents…

     

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    June 25, 2009 12:20 PM EDT
    I need to have a better understanding of what it is that you sell to answer your quesiton.  What is your web site address?

    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 270 posts
    August 21, 2009 5:50 AM EDT

    I saw this article today and it contains some good food for thought on this subject:

     

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090821/ap_on_re_us/us_shopping_cart_abandonment




    ---
    Bert at Harvey Software, Inc.
    Multi-Carrier Shipping Software and Supply Chain Solutions for Internet Retailers

    Also a provider of free shipping information and resources at Harvey Software`s Parcel Shipping Blog along with free tracking solutions at TrackingPage.com...

    • 4 posts
    December 6, 2011 4:05 AM EST

    I totally agree that free shipping on its own can be very bad.  Shipping is a cost that must be accounted for in some way.

    ---
    couch grass

    • 355 posts
    June 4, 2009 6:27 PM EDT
    First, customers always look at shipping and handling cost.  Most customers also know how to calculate shipping cost depending on the carrier service used.

    Second, S & H charges should be reasonable.  How mush does it actually cost in man hours for instance to pull and pack the order. 

    Don`t forget there is also and order processing charge.  For most businesses this is about $25.00 to $30.00 to process an order.  And yes, this processing fee amount has been researched.  That`s why a lot of businesses have gone to minimum order amounts or charge a surcharge on small orders. Hence, you can have a $42.00 S & H charge on a small order.

    Finally, there is the actual shipping charge.

    It`s also best to disclose these charges up front rather than on the invoice you send the customer.  The customer can then decide to buy from you or someone else.

    nevadascul6/4/2009 11:23 PM

    ---
    The older we get, the more excuses we make for not chasing after our dreams. But truth is, goals are attainable at any age.

    • 355 posts
    June 5, 2009 4:05 PM EDT
    Hi Graig,

    Don`t mean to disagree, but most customers can figure almost to the penny what their shipping charges will be if the know the carrier, weight of the package, and method of shipment (normal ground, next day, truck).  They get the rate information on line from the freight companies and then plug in the other figures. 

    nevadascul6/6/2009 12:03 PM

    ---
    The older we get, the more excuses we make for not chasing after our dreams. But truth is, goals are attainable at any age.

    • 5 posts
    June 2, 2009 11:30 AM EDT
    This has been debated for years - I remember debating this back in 1998 with several e-commerce shippers, and Jupiter Research did a pretty thorough study back in 2001.  Anyone who thinks that online purchasers don`t care about shipping costs should read up on what customers are willing to go through to avoid them - http://www.smartmoney.com/spending/deals/5-ways-to-save-on-online-shipping-fees-23480/

    On the flip side, in the past keeping the shipping costs separate from displayed product costs were used to game shopping comparison engines.  However, the best engines now include shipping costs and taxes in their calculations.

    Some of the best ideas I`ve seen - ones that clients have asked me to incorporate in their web solutions - come from a great research article from Wharton - "The Psychology of Free Shipping."  Offering discount coupons, referral discounts, promotional shipping discounts - especially when announcing them during the shopping cart interactive experience in stead of banners, pre-purchase promotions, etc. - can demonstratably affect abandonment.

    I would, however, challenge your assertion that shipping costs are a major driver for shopping cart abandonment.  One older MarketingSherpa blog post references the huge difference between perceived abandonment rates and actual measured results.  A recent study by Opinion Research Corporation, "Consumers Sound Off On Online Shopping Frustrations: Survey, "  disclosed dissatisfaction (subtly different than abandonment I agree) with the online shopping experience as:
    • 19% dislike learning an item was back ordered or out of stock after said item was placed in a shopping cart;
    • 14% are frustrated by Web sites that malfunction as payment is being processed;
    • 8% are confounded by unclear return policies;
    • 6% don’t like unclear shipping information; and
    • Another 6% dislike not getting an acknowledgment after an order has been placed.
    In the end, what new e-commerce sites should consider is to find new and innovative ways to interact with the shopper - while browsing, when checking out, and even when abandoning their cart.  Explaining shipping costs up front - and offer ways for consumers to reduce those costs - will go a long way.  Amazon, for one, does a great job in educating consumers on shipping and providing various options for reducing those costs.  So much depends on the actual site construction, product, the shopper`s attitude, and the market climate.  Why guess - ask!  The good news is that with so much room for improvement, the site that gets it right should get well rewarded for their efforts.

    ---
    Phillip Barnhart
    Web Architect / Managing Partner
    SiteRiver: Web Applications Intelligence

    LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook |

    • 5 posts
    June 3, 2009 4:37 AM EDT
    Michelle Megna at E-Commerce trends recently summed it up
    Another topic that continued to make news this
    year is shipping and whether or not offering free
    shipping is a smart marketing choice or a death knell for
    the bottom line.

    Some industry watchers say shoppers expect free shipping,
    and not offering free shipping means you`ll lose sales.
    On the other hand, many say there are other ways to offer
    delivery discounts that won`t eat up profit margins and
    argue that customers are actually more willing to swap
    free shipping for other types of incentives. The debate
    is still alive and well, and while many e-tailers have
    found formulas that work for their individual business,
    we don`t expect the discussion to go away in
    2009.

    (Source: http://www.ecommerce-
    guide.com/news/trends/article.php/3793346)

    Videography`s posted example I think goes to the point of
    studying shopping cart abandonment in general. We don`t
    take "providing a quality experience" very seriously. We
    make them mad. Greed and short-sightedness on the part
    of the seller is not limited to the e-commerce field.
    But have things changed in the past few years? I`m not
    sure - I still give all my new web site clients the book
    "Don`t Make Me Think" before we go over their web
    designs.

    As long as web retailers refuse to do usability studies,
    refuse to apply heatmaps and other technical tools to
    measuring the user experience, and fail to listen to the
    consumer, shopping carts and web e-commerce sites will
    continue to stumble along. With so many things still
    done poorly, there are way too many independent variables
    to control for to make a statistically valid study.       

    Consumers don`t want us to charge $30 shipping and
    handling to for an 8 ounce product. Consumers also don`t
    expect 50 pounds of dog food to be shipped overnight for
    free. They are intelligent - and we would be better off
    simply explaining shipping fees than gimmicking our
    customers.
    siteriver2009-6-3 9:44:49

    ---
    Phillip Barnhart
    Web Architect / Managing Partner
    SiteRiver: Web Applications Intelligence

    LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook |

    • 747 posts
    June 8, 2009 10:32 AM EDT
    As a customer or potential customer - I never want to figure out shipping charges. I prefer "free shipping" (I do assume there is shipping built into the price). I do consider my total cost, the cost of the product plus shipping when comparing various vendors.
     
    I do not want to be surprised either - with shipping charges added on right before I check-out.
     
    "Free shipping" sells and it is more customer friendly.
     
    ~Roland
     
     

    ---
    Web Design | Best Beef Jerky | ecommerce articles | Follow vwebworld on Twitter

    • 434 posts
    June 2, 2009 2:58 PM EDT
    I can`t tell you how many carts I`ve abandoned when I got to the shipping costs.  I am convinced that far too many web-based businesses are trying to make the shipping a profit center.  For example, a S&H of $30 for an item weighing less than one pound???  Especially when the second identical item doubles the shipping to $60.  Gimme a break.  I ship via USPS Priority mail flat-rate all the time and it ain`t no $30.

    Steve Mann
    (In the boonies - no Fry`s here)


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    Steve Mann
    Internet Videographer
    MannMade Digital Video
    My Email


    • 434 posts
    June 3, 2009 9:46 AM EDT
    I once received an email from a web firm.. "We recently saw you were interested in ....., and wondered why you left without completing the order."

    They were polite about it, so I replied that the shipping costs killed the order.  The product was $30, weighed a few ounces, not fragile, and the shipping was $42.  A few weeks later I looked at the site again, and their policy is now "Free shipping unless otherwise noted".  (Of course the prices are slightly higher).The otherwise noted covers them for the things shipped FOB or requiring a fork-lift.

    Steve Mann


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    Steve Mann
    Internet Videographer
    MannMade Digital Video
    My Email