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New invention

    • 990 posts
    May 12, 2009 4:29 AM EDT
    stay away from "invention promotion companies."  they can not and will not help you.
     
    Many parties will not sign an NDA, which is litle help even if they do sign it.
     
     
     

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    James Lindon, Ph.D. Patent Attorney
    Lindon & Lindon, LLC
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Patents, Trademarks, Copyrights, Pharmacy Law, Litigation
    [this is not legal advice - provided for discussion only]
    Intellectual Property for the Individual and Small Business: Identify, Protect, Enforce, Defend.
    "Fools rush in where angels fear to tread."
    http://www.LindonLaw.com

    • 18 posts
    July 21, 2009 12:42 PM EDT
    I agree with everyone`s advice regarding staying away from invention promotion companies.  My company is on the product development and manufacturing side--but if you`re interested in exploring patenting and licensing the product, I would look at inventorsalliance.org and inventright.com for resources and help.   They focus on education, they know their stuff, and are legit.

    Ashton
    • 37 posts
    May 10, 2009 6:31 PM EDT
    I`d stay away from the invent companies that want money upfont.  I`ve seen their work on the news shows and one of my employees got soaked for 20K he didn`t have.  Then I saw a patent for one similar my employee`s come out of the company`s associate company in Canada.  The "business plan" he got was almost 100% boilerplate.  Worthless!
     
    The TV show wrapped a piece of copper pipe around their neck to hold their cellular phone - the "invent" company said it was a great idea - just needed 10K to get it off the ground.
      
    One of the millionaires before 30 I read about years ago watched his buddy roll a "cigarette" and use 2 rolling papers - took the idea for doublesize to one of the paper companies and gets a royalty on every one sold.
     
    There are pittfalls both ways - protect yourself 1st.  I would probably approach the company as it is most important to them.  But as the guy who sued Sears learned - even the biggest companies can do bad things.  Be careful - good luck!
    BizOptimizer5/10/2009 11:27 PM

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    Ed
    Business Optimization - www.businessoptimization.biz

    • 37 posts
    May 11, 2009 5:43 AM EDT

    I am not sure would need anything more than a utility patent or something to prove you had the idea first - talk to a patent attorney.  But patents aren`t always enforcable anyway.

    More important to get an agreement that if they use it in any form - they have to pay you for doing so.  They`ll be reluctant to sign it, as it may be on their drawing board - so you try to take care of as many of the contingencies as possible.  But at some point you have to trust - just don`t do it blindly -
     
    Good luck,

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    Ed
    Business Optimization - www.businessoptimization.biz

    • 376 posts
    May 12, 2010 11:26 AM EDT

    Hello Yort!

    Boy oh boy there are some smart folks on this board!!  Sargent is right in that you absolutely need to do a patent search; first and foremost regardless of your intentions to get one, simply to insure you are not infringing on someone else’s IP.  From there, there are 2 main schools of thought… To patent or not to patent….  Some folks are of the opinion “The first one to market wins”.  While I do agree that if you can protect your idea, you probably should (or at least get a provisional to explore the possibility that your invention has legs) having a patent is not a necessity or a prerequisite by any means to make a living with your product.  It’s all about market share baby!  HOWEVER, as Roger said, a lot also depends on whether you want to simply license it or build a company around it.   What are your thoughts for this “product”?  Do you want to build a company or do you want to take the money and run?

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    Leslie
    Founder and President
    Charmed Life Products LLC
    Grill Charms™… The MUST HAVE grilling accessory that is revolutionizing the American Cook-out AND The perfect gift for any occasion!
    Grill Charms
                                                                                                        

    • 1 posts
    May 12, 2010 4:10 AM EDT

    I agree with Wisepreneur the patent is only as good as your ability to enforce it. You can do a search yourself on the patent office website. Also, do a web search for similar items before spending any money.

    You also have to decide are you looking to license your idea to a company or manufacture it yourself?  You can approach a company with a NDA. Do not send them your working model unless they ask for it. Companies don't want to be responsible for items they did not request if it gets lost or damaged.

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    http://www.rogerbrown.net http://www.looking2license.com

    • 4 posts
    May 10, 2009 4:01 PM EDT
    I have an invention that i developed more than six months ago. It`s an improvement from an existing product. I have a working Model that i use everyday. I feel that this will be a huge success. I do not have the thousands upfront that the invent help companies want. Can i take my product to a manufacturer and show them the improvement and go from there? . and if so how can i protect my idea beforehand?
    • 4 posts
    May 11, 2009 2:35 AM EDT
    How do i protect myself?. Patent? NDA?.