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Best green businesses to start

    • 2 posts
    December 10, 2008 3:04 AM EST
    Hello everyone, I work from home part time and I am an Independent Distributor for CandleWealth International Inc. It is a home income/business opportunity that gives you the choice of making your own All Natural Soy Candles or sell the company`s branded All Natural Soy Candles or both. CandleWealth also has soy based shampoo & conditioner but its mission is to change the world one natural soy candle at a time. The current market of candles are dominated by parafin candles a by-product of the petroleum industry, 96% of a $3 billion dollar a year industry are paraffin candles.
     
    PARAFFIN CANDLES are the #1 Source Of INDOOR Air Pollution. So what is the solution CandleWealth International. CandleWealth`s Exclusive ALL NATURAL WAX CANDLES DO NOT produce the TOXINS, SOOT, CARCINOGENS, etc. directly attributed to the #1 indoor air pollution, the Paraffin Candle!
    Soy  candles are non-toxic, clean burning, longer lasting, better smelling, biodegradable, and they support the AMERICAN FARMER!!!
     
    For every 50 miles there are $1 million dollars in candle sales, candles are the #1 gift that is given every year. Most people have not even heard of soy candles and more importantly don`t know that the candles they are burning are petroleum based.  So the next time you buy a candle for yourself or for someone you love make sure it is 100% natural soy.
     

                            "Friends Don`t Let Friends Burn Paraffin "

     
    Want more info or take a look at our products visit http://www.candlewealth.com/phillycandle

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    "Friends Don`t Let Friends Burn Paraffin"

    • 2 posts
    January 19, 2009 12:38 PM EST
    Hey Rich, this product is in 9 out of 10 homes. It is a 6 billion dollar a year industry, and this product has been around for hundreds of years. Most people are not even aware of the dangers that are involved with this product. And it is the #1 cause for indoor pollution. I`m talking paraffin candles.
     

    Have you ever wondered what candles are really made of?  Did you know that petroleum and kerosene waste has been the primary material for candles?  The petroleum is bleached and texturized with a chemical called Acrolein, color and scent is added to create a paraffin candle.  Sounds relaxing?  Yep, the fuel residue powered for our vehicles is what you are burning and breathing in your home.   

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently rated indoor air pollution as one of the five most urgent environmental issues accounting for over $1 billion in direct healthcare costs each year. In fact, the EPA, the American Lung Association (ALA) and the Envirodesic Certification Program, all believe that the air in most homes is likely to be ten times more polluted than the air outside!  Only from a few candles. Testing and air chambers analysis by the EPA has found the following compounds in a random group of over 30 paraffin candles tested.  These tests also show that burning paraffin candles can produce a variety of harmful substances in SIGNIFICANT quantities including,                                  

                         

    Acetone, Benzene, Trichlorofluoromethane, Carbon Disulfide, Butanone, Trichloroethane, Carbon Tetrachloride, Carbon Black (soot) Particulate Matter, Styrene, Xylene, Ethyl benzene, Phenol, Cresol, and Lead.

    What is the natural alternative?

    Soy wax is made from natural soybeans grown right here in the USA.  In a 60lb bushel, 49lbs of soy meal and 11lbs of soybean oil are produced.  The soy meal is used for soy milk, tofu, "veggie" burgers and also animal feed.  The 11lbs of soybean oil is made into wax through a partial hydrogenation process.  Therefore the entire soybean is not wasted.  Purchasing soy candles is an excellent way to support American farmers.

    Per ounce the all natural soy candle will burn approximately 9 to 10 hours depending on the location of the candle.  For example, an 8oz candle it will burn approx 70-80 hours, definitely a better value for your dollar. Soy burns cooler, longer, cleaner and has a greater scent throw (scent distance), up to 3 times further than paraffin candles, for the entire burn of the candle.  Since there are no added chemicals, soy candles are non carcinogenic and no black soot residue is emitted.  Hot soapy water is all you`ll need to clean the container and a spill.   

    Soy candles are the next new trend for the candle industry.
    to find out more visit www.candlewealth.com/phillycandle

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    "Friends Don`t Let Friends Burn Paraffin"

    • 54 posts
    April 9, 2008 5:58 PM EDT
    Great Idea

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    • 6 posts
    July 17, 2008 8:03 AM EDT
    Every business should be green.  I can`t think of a single business that wouldn`t benefit from sustainable business practices.
     
    It reduces costs, attracts and motivates employees, improves supply chains and improves customer and community relations.
     
    Companies with green practices outperform their competition. 
     
    Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.  The future is green.
    www.GreenCPA.blogspot.com

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    Check out my blog at www.GreenCPA.blogspot.com

    • 6 posts
    August 12, 2008 9:49 AM EDT
    A Green business is dedicated to being Green.  Which means managing for the triple-bottom line of people, planet and profits.
     
    While being Green is all the rage, much of what is being said is greenwashing and mere marketing.  Companies that embrace being Green as a driving force will be transparent, honest and clear about their claims. 
     
    It means looking at your supply chain and pushing for constant improvements from your suppliers.
     
    Being Green will attract customers, employees, interest and investments.  The future is Green and every business can embrace the vision.  Doing it to be part of the lastest marketing trend is shortsighted and will end up costing you in the long-run when people find out you lack substance and the competition leaves you sitting in the dust.
     
    I blog about Green businesses.  Check out my blog at www.GreenCPA.blogspot.com

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    Check out my blog at www.GreenCPA.blogspot.com

    • 4 posts
    May 7, 2008 11:30 AM EDT
    This topic was started a while ago, but rather than start a new one on the same line... there`s a lot of different ways to be "green" I really respect the big businesses who do a lot in their plants to make them more green... which is obviously worth advertising, since companies like Subaru and manufacturers of household appliances etc are edvertising this fact.
    Then there are the products themselves... a lot of companies advertise that they are safer for the environment, and your home.
     
    The best line of products that are eco-friendly and not overly expensive is also one of the best busniness opportunities I have found (yes, yes, it is the business opportunity I am involved in, of course). I may be biased, but the facts are facts. I am proud of the great products that help get toxins out of your home by replacing them with reasonably priced and VERY effective alternatives (no more bleach!!! YAY). The company manufactures it`s own unique products, and is itself is so GREEN it hurts. It`s GREAT.
     
    Going Green is a great trend I hope sticks around and keeps growing! I just love working with a company that helps me, our customers, and the environment all prosper!
    mightyfork5/7/2008 4:33 PM

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    WORK AT HOME UNITED
    Your life, your dreams, your business
    http://www.workathomeunited.com/carrief

    my blog: Quitters Always Prosper: quit messing around and start succeeding!

    • 2 posts
    January 20, 2009 6:38 PM EST
    I have started a curbside recycling business in my county, Carson Valley Recycling; www.cvrecycling.com.  I feel I have the "GREEN" term down!  I can`t tell you yet how profitable it is as the market in the recyclables has crashed, but everybody pays a "subscription" fee for us to come and pick it up, so that in itself covers the expenses.  We have been in full operation since June of 2008.  It took about 1.5 years to get it started and lot of our own money.  
    If I can survive this recession, I am fine with my costs being covered and my household expenses also.  This business has humbled me as to what is important.  I feel very good about helping the environment my children are growing up in and how I`m leading by example with them.  The reward in not polluting the "land" anymore.  I agree fully with nhgnikole `s reply.  There is a saying, "keep it simple silly", meaning start with one or two things and grow from there when you`re ready and comfortable.  I started with recycling plastic and cardboard, then I added glass, tin/aluminum, and now I`ve added all papers.  Do you know how little garbage I have left?  Starting tomorrow, we will be composting with a worm bin called a "Can of Worms", which a local company here sells,"Full Circle Compost".  I am so excited to do this!  (My family also)  How rewarding!  I might even be able to grow roses for the first time ever!  I would love to be able to use the movie "WALL-E" as my educational movie for others interested in "why recycle?"  That`s why things don`t grow where "landfills" are.  T O X I C ground from everyone`s "trash".  There`s more to success than the $$ figure.  At times when I`m wondering how I`ll pay a bill.....I`m just as full of that "reward" feeling knowing I`m doing something good and green for the environment.  
    Amber Emery
    CEO
    Carson Valley Recycling
    cvrecycling@mac.com
    • 13 posts
    March 18, 2008 9:31 AM EDT
    I have read a lot about recycling clothes. Reusing the fiber used to make clothing could be an area of focus.

    What do you all think?


    Hmmm. If cost-effective, this is a great idea. I think it would fly on the level of a supplier to the garment industry. And such a supplier could of course purchase some of their raw materials from the likes of Goodwill, helping the community and building an exemplary reputation.

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    Enjoy seeing the web and computer languages and methodologies evolve, or rather, revolve, for over 20 years! Revolve = rename and repackage the same old features and processes, and claim that the old is actually new!

    • 19 posts
    June 26, 2007 4:37 PM EDT
    I not sure what is hot to others but I know what I am excited about.

    My business will focus on dealing with the ever increasing e-waste stream by reusing, remarketing and  properly disposing of  electronic trash.


    sdlewis2007-6-26 23:54:18

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    Steven Lewis
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    “Do or do not... there is no try.” - Yoda

    • 19 posts
    June 28, 2007 4:06 PM EDT
    Taking all the wonderful discussions and very  passionate opinions into consideration, what are the..."Best Green businesses to start"? 

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    Steven Lewis
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    “Do or do not... there is no try.” - Yoda

    • 19 posts
    June 28, 2007 4:09 PM EDT
    I have read a lot about recycling clothes. Reusing the fiber used to make clothing could be an area of focus.

    What do you all think?

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    Steven Lewis
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    “Do or do not... there is no try.” - Yoda

    • 19 posts
    July 6, 2007 4:50 PM EDT
    chet

    I appreciate the depth of your post and I agree that Hemp should be utilized as a crop plant for so many reasons.



      

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    Steven Lewis
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    “Do or do not... there is no try.” - Yoda

    • 19 posts
    July 6, 2007 5:04 PM EDT
    rossb

    I think the problem lies in many areas. One is probably the emergence of petroleum based products, i.e. nylon rope.

    Also I think that Hemp is not a panacea to our challenges in the U.S. but one more tool to overcome them. We are already seeing a negative effect of corn based ethanol by our beef and poultry prices going up due to the competition between feed corn and ethanol corn.

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    Steven Lewis
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    “Do or do not... there is no try.” - Yoda

    • 19 posts
    July 7, 2007 4:46 AM EDT
    rossb

    You read chet`s post correctly about hemp being illegal in the U.S. and I always thought it was because hemp is a relative to marijuana and marijuana is illegal so guilt by association type thing.

    I did a quick google search for "the real reason why hemp is illegal" which was very interesting.




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    Steven Lewis
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    “Do or do not... there is no try.” - Yoda

    • 19 posts
    July 11, 2007 4:42 AM EDT
    I am with you. Been catching up on posts due to some busy days at work.

    My personal opinion about renewable sources of energy involves using as many sources as possible to maximize output. Wind of course is a part of the formula for success.

    I envision a decentralized energy infrastructure in our future. Currently we have huge electrical generation plants distributing  power over  long distances.  What I see is reversal over time where I put solar collectors on my roof and maybe a small wind turbine in my back yard.  My household will use the power that is collected and generated and any excess would go back into the power grid.

    Over time many more folks are doing the same thing and more power is being put into the grid from decentralized mini power plants i.e. homes, businesses.

    Maybe local governments could subsidize the initial cost to outfit a roof with solar collectors or wind turbines. Or a business start up would make it affordable to equip homes with alternative power sources and organize the customers into a huge collection of mini power plants.

    Of course this is all very high level and all my opinion.



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    Steven Lewis
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    “Do or do not... there is no try.” - Yoda

    • 19 posts
    July 11, 2007 7:14 AM EDT
    Mike

    Exactly what I am thinking. Multiple sources that help overcome each others weaknesses.

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    Steven Lewis
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    “Do or do not... there is no try.” - Yoda

    • 9 posts
    August 1, 2008 10:36 AM EDT
    I sincerely want to know, is a business that markets itself as "green" and plans to garner business because of being green viable in the long-term?  Is "green" a fad or a long-term trend?  Can a business that markets as "green" and gets business because of it be viable for 5 years? 10 years?  30 years?  How long can "green" be considered a competitive advantage?  I am asking these questions in all sincerity.

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    Thanks!

    drm7

    • 1 posts
    July 22, 2008 8:49 AM EDT
    I`m crazy about solar thermal heaters because they are inexpensive to build and work very well. In the northeast you could do a good business making solar heaters out of recycled beer cans.

    Gordon

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    Looking For Renewable Energy Entrepreneurs

    • 1 posts
    January 24, 2008 5:23 AM EST
    Hi everyone.  I`m new to this site but love all the dialogue that is happening here.  I have also been thinking a lot about green businesses recently.  I agree that our power sources will be decentralized in the future.  I definitely think some of the bigger, energy conglomerates will offer green energy but I foresee a big push in individual self-sufficiency coming on. 
     
    In addition to solar and wind, I have often wondered if the production of methane gas could be incorporated on an idividual basis.  Before you start making jokes about individual "methane production"  . . . I was hoping to get someone`s opinion with more knowledge on the subject than myself.  I know a lot of farms are taking animal waste, harnessing the methane gas, and converting it into energy.  There is a farm in VT that is doing this currently.  I was wondering if there would be a cost-efficient way of creating something like this for the individual household.  Maybe harnessing methane from a compost pile that could also be used as a source of energy???  Just brainstorming here.
     
    Regardless, I am very interested in pursuing alternative energy businesses.  I have thought about creating a distributorship based upon "Becoming Self Sufficient".  The idea being, the company would sit down with the customer, analyze their energy usage, find ways to trim down energy usage (new windows, insulation, etc.), propose a 5-10 year plan for purchasing solar, wind, etc. and providing the customer with these products and installing them.  Any thoughts on this idea?  Like I said, I`m not the most technical person but I really believe a business like this would thrive. 
     
    - Greg
    • 5 posts
    March 18, 2008 7:13 AM EDT
    I belong to an organization called Co-op America. They have an email list serve where people share ideas, events, etc. I have learned a lot from this group. I would consider my business to be green. I sell natural pest control and cleaning products at www.RepellNet.com. I believe that it is imperative that all businesses do something for the environment even if it is just recycling the paper.
    kjlltd3/18/2008 12:19 PM

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    Kathy Lauwagie
    RepellNet Natural Pest Control Products
    www.RepellNet.com

    • 38 posts
    June 19, 2007 5:48 PM EDT

    Forgive me if this sounds picky, but what constitutes a green business? 





    I don`t think this is picky at all. This is one of the biggest challenges facing the movement today. I also think that before we go looking for green businesses to start, we need to first answer that fundamental question.

    Because you can not build a green business until you understand the issues of sustainability.

    These are just some of the first questions we need to ask if we are going to operate a truly green business:
    • Am I creating additional waste by producing things that will eventually be discarded?

    • Am I consuming non-renewable resources that deplete the environment from which they came without putting anything back?

    • Am I conducting sound business practices that actually enrich the world I operate in?
    These may sound judgmental or idealistic, but they are the fundamental questions at the heart of the green issue. If you can`t answer these honestly, you can`t claim to be green. (Notice I didn`t say what your answer should be.)

    For those of you who believe that conducting digital-based businesses are green by definition, I hate to tell you that you`re wrong. The digital industry (manufacturers and service providers alike) are massive polluters.

    In order to truly be green, you need to consider and take action in the following areas:
    • Creating a specific purchasing and supply sourcing policy
    • Reducing energy and water consumption
    • Minimizing (or eliminating) your waste stream
    • Considering the life cycle of your product (or the ramifactions of your service)
    etc etc.

    I get very frustrated by businesses that approach sustainability as though it`s a simple add-on to the regular way they do business. (I`m not directing this at anyone here, by the way.) Incorporating these things into your business takes a lot of effort and a lot of careful thought. There are many easy, simple things we can each do right now to start to make a difference, but the fact remains that the bulk of the solutions aren`t easy nor are they always obvious.

    Just something to think about before diving into a "green business." This ain`t some social networking craze where you can throw up a blog and call yourself 2.0.

    —Jess
    Roughstock2007-6-19 22:49:50

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    Roughstock Studios | Notes From the Rodeo | Newsletter
    Strategic communications without the selling of souls.

    • 38 posts
    June 27, 2007 8:21 AM EDT
    I think that your opinion in grouping all digital businesses together is a little wrong. Just because some are polluters doesn`t make all of them this way.


    With all due respect, every single one of us is a polluter, whether we like it or not. When I say "digital businesses" I mean anyone who relies on computer technology to do what they do. Fact is, the computer industry is a brutal polluter across the board by definition—the materials and components are highly toxic (e.g. CRT screens and even LCDs). Nothing you or I can do about that except make informed choices—purchase LCDs (which have less mercury, etc.) and push the manufacturers to find new—sustainable—ways of building their machines. In addition to the actual hardware, you`ve got the issue of energy consumption. Every server sucks energy. Again, it`s about informed decisions. I`m in the process of researching hosting, for example, to try and find one that is both reliable and is powered by renewable energy (my current host just buys carbon credits, which is iffy).

    I hate to burst your bubble, but ALL OF US rely on computers these days, which implicates us in the supply chain. ALL OF US are polluters and are adding to the environmental problems we see in the world. Which is why it is so important for EACH of us to cop to it and start trying to take steps towards a more sustainable way of doing, purchasing, using, etc. Instead of getting upset at being called out, just admit it and move on. Try to find a better solution. People keep getting offended that they`re being held accountable for their own actions. It`s time to move on.




    I also think that "green extremism" puts people off. For example, many people can make a difference doing small things, like walking instead of driving, or carpooling instead of driving alone.

    But when you start getting down to every little number and spend 20 minutes analyzing cloth napkins vs paper ... not only do you make people feel wrong, but you make them feel that every bit isn`t counting. This actually *hurts* the effort towards sustainability, not helps. Because if they thought they were helping by doing ______ and you tell them it`s wrong/not enough/whatever ... people will just stop bothering. Heck, if they have been using cloth napkins when they really wanted to use paper towels, and that turned out wrong ... they might as well start using their car again! Screw it.

    I think this shouldn`t be about "green perfection" ... it should be about doing whatever we can to make it better, one bit at a time. More "baby steps" and less "in your face".



    Who said anything about perfection or extremism? Please don`t put words in my mouth. I can only assume your comment about cloth vs. paper napkins refers to the recent entry on my Small Failures blog? If you had read further, you actually would have discovered that my approach is far from demanding perfection from anyone. The blog offers practical, useful advice for how to slowly and bit-by-bit incorporate sustainability into your daily life. The whole point of it is that perfection is impossible, so we need to instead address the daily (and small) habits and choices that we each make every day.

    I`m sorry that you feel spending 20 minutes analyzing whether or not your actions are bad for the environment is a waste of time but quite frankly, that`s why we`re in the trouble we`re in. And 20 minutes spent worrying about the napkins you use seems to me to be a far easier decision than deciding to never drive again, no?

    Seems to me that the more we avoid the little decisions, the easier it is to avoid the big ones. Hence climate change and water shortages and all the other problems we`ve brought on ourselves. I guess I`m just tired of hearing people complain that they`re being treated unfairly for simply being held accountable. Is this really what we`ve come to?

    And honestly, I`m a little surprised that I`m being taken to task for helping people find small ways that they can make a difference. I`m sorry if you feel like throwing up your hands and just saying "screw it," but don`t put that on me. That`s your reaction, and it`s not me that`s causing it. Over a thousand people every month read Small Failures and the bulk of them think it`s very cool that there`s a non-preachy resource out there holding their hand through the difficult process of learning about these issues. Clearly, you`re not one of them and that`s just fine. I don`t tell people what to do, and I don`t tell people that they`re doing something wrong. If you don`t like people pointing out facts, that`s a whole different story. Judgment has nothing to do with it, though.

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    Roughstock Studios | Notes From the Rodeo | Newsletter
    Strategic communications without the selling of souls.

    • 38 posts
    June 28, 2007 10:41 AM EDT
    Ethanol is a great case in point.  I have yet to make a personal determination about ethanol but I think it is unwise to blindly assume it`s the answer to all our fuel problems just because there is so much noise saying it is. 





    Ross, I couldn`t agree more. The growing push for ethanol has a lot of repercussions that have not yet been adequately addressed, especially in regards to the impact on our food supply.

    I think the problem—and perhaps this helps fuel those who dismiss sustainabality as a useless or impractical or unproven endeavor—is twofold:

    1) There are still many unknowns. Our understanding of the complexities and interdependent nature of our various ecological, economic and political systems is still young. As a society, we are only now beginning to accept the fact that these systems are interdependent, and so we still have a lot to learn about how they work (and don`t work) together. Because of this, there are very few proven standards with which to judge many of the new "solutions" being touted by all three sectors. We`re seeing a growth of standards-setting groups for business (B-Corporation being the latest I`ve heard about), but each has their own methodology. This poses obvious challenges.

    2) Many of the answers are counterintuitive. This speaks directly to the ethanol issue; what may seem like a reasonable solution may actually not be. Given that our consumerist culture is so attached to the instant-gratification-act-before-thinking mentality, ideas may be getting implemented before we do enough research. This of course, could squelch all our efforts before we even have a chnace to discover the "best" options.

    This is why I feel so strongly that the only way true sustainability can be achieved—if at all—is if there is a paradigm shift in how we approach almost everything: economy, ecology, politics, population, organization, technology, etc. Of course, I`m no dummy. That`s a tall order. But I think our culture has taken a pretty dramatic turn since, say, 1960. There`s no reason to think it won`t shift again—maybe in an entirely different direction—over the next several decades. And if it does, it is likely to happen at an even more rapid rate than previous changes.

    Anyway, it`s hard not to get philosophical about this when looking at the ground-level/practical implementation of particular ideas.

    —J.

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    Roughstock Studios | Notes From the Rodeo | Newsletter
    Strategic communications without the selling of souls.

    • 1 posts
    July 8, 2008 7:48 AM EDT
    Big drag, Ross!  I clicked on the link and got this message: This video is no longer available due to a copyright claim by BBC Worldwide Ltd. What was it about?
    • 12 posts
    June 28, 2007 2:35 PM EDT

    If we put all the available farm land into growing corn (or other crops) to produce ehtanol, it still wouldn`t make much of a dent in what is needed to replace fossil fuels.  And what energy would we use to produce the ethanol?  What would we do with the waste from its production.

    We CAN produce all the hydrogen needed to power this entire planet using existing,replenishing, totally "green" resourses and clean up the poluted enviroment in five years!

    Mike